Indian Management programs: Are we innovative enough?


By

Dr. T. Thomas
Director
Management Studies
Bellary Engineering College
Bellary-583104
 


This paper explores the possibility of introducing certain innovative approaches to Management Education in India. There is a need for Indian society to move away from the concept of offering the best world class programs for the elitist and forgetting our less fortunate brethren. In fact the sheer number of the latter forms a vast resource for the country and we have to tap their huge potential to the benefit of one and all.

According to Peter Drucker,  innovation is "a change that creates a new dimension of performance". Nothing can be more epoch-making than innovations in Management Education.

India, being a fragmented society has lot of scope for Management Programs in regional languages. According to the Language In India page containing data from the 1991 Census of India, there are a total of 114 languages with more than 10,000 speakers, of which 18 are ``Scheduled Languages'' and 96 are not specified in the schedule. The census also mentions 216 ``mother tongues''. The Census India page has a break up of the major languages and the number of speakers of the language.

According to http://www.censusindia.gov.in/Census_Data_2001/Census_Data_Online/Language/statement9.htm   the  Family-Wise Grouping Of The 122 Scheduled And Non-Scheduled Languages 2001 mentions only 0.02% of the population mentioning  Germanic language, ie English  as their mother tongue. Please see table below:

STATEMENT - 9
FAMILY-WISE GROUPING OF THE 122 SCHEDULED AND NON-SCHEDULED LANGUAGES 2001

Language families

Number of Languages

Persons who returned the languages as their mother tongue

Percentage to total population

1

2

3

4

1. Indo-European
(a) Indo-Aryan


21


790,627,060


76.86

(b) Iranian

2

        22,774

0.00

(c) Germanic

1

      226,449

0.02

2. Dravidian

17

214,172,874

20.82

3. Austro-Asiatic

14

 11,442,029

 1.11

4. Tibeto-Burmese

66

 10,305,026

 1.00

5. Semito-Hamitic

1

      51,728

 0.01

Total

12

1,026,847,940*

99.82*


* The balance of 1,762,388 (0.17%) population out of total Indian population
1,028,610,328 comprises of 1,635,280 speakers of those languages and mother tongues which were not identifiable or returned by less than 10000 speakers at all India level and the population ( 127,108 persons) of Manipur which was not included in language data since the Census results were cancelled in 3 sub-divisions of Senapati district of Manipur.in 2001. 

The names of the 122 Scheduled and Non-Scheduled languages falling in the above five language families are given below with the Scheduled Languages denoted as (S). Of the 22 Scheduled Languages, 15 fall in the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European family, 1 in Austro-Asiatic family, 4 in the Dravidian family and 2 in the Tibeto-Burmese family. 

1. INDO-EUROPEAN

(a) INDO-ARYAN

1. Assamese (S), 2. Bengali(S), 3. Bhili/Bhilodi, 4. Bishnupuriya, 5. Dogri(S) 6. Gujarati(S), 7. Halabi,    8. Hindi(S), 9. Kashmiri(S), 10. Khandeshi,11. Konkani(S), 12. Lahnda. 13. Maithili(S), 14. Marathi(S), 15. Nepali(S), 16. Oriya(S), 17. Punjabi(S), 18. Sanskrit(S), 19. Shina, 20. Sindhi(S), 21. Urdu(S),

(b) IRANIAN

1. Afghani/Kabuli/Pashto, 2. Persian

(c) GERMANIC

1. English.  

2. DRAVIDIAN

1. Coorgi/Kodagu, 2. Gondi, 3. Jatapu, 4. Kannada(S), 5. Khond/Kondh, 6. Kisan, 7. Kolami, 8. Konda, 9.Koya, 10. Kui, 11. Kurukh/Oraon, 12. Malayalam(S), 13. Malto, 14. Parji, 15 Tamil(S), 16. Telugu(S), 17.Tulu. 

3. AUSTRO-ASIATIC

1. Bhumij, 2. Gadaba, 3. Ho, 4. Juang, 5. Kharia, 6. Khasi, 7. Koda/Kora, 8. Korku, 9. Korwa, 10. Munda, 11.Mundari, 12. Nicobarese, 13. Santali(S) 14.Savara. 

4. TIBETO-BURMESE

1. Adi, 2. Anal, 3. Angami, 4. Ao, 5. Balti, 6. Bhotia, 7. Bodo (S), 8. Chakesang, 9. Chakru/Chokri, 10. Chang, 11. Deori, 12. Dimasa, 13. Gangte, 14. Garo,15. Halam, 16. Hmar, 17. Kabui, 18. Karbi/Mikir, 19. Khezha,  20. Khiemnungan, 21.Kinnauri, 22. Koch, 23. Kom, 24. Konyak, 25. Kuki, 26. Ladakhi, 27. Lahauli, 28. Lakher, 29. Lalung, 30. Lepcha, 31. Liangmei, 32. Limbu, 33.Lotha, 34. Lushai/Mizo, 35. Manipuri(S), 36. Maram,  37. Maring, 38. Miri/Mishing, 39. Mishmi, 40. Mogh, 41. Monpa, 42. Nissi/Dafla, 43. Nocte, 44. Paite, 45. Pawi, 46. Phom, 47. Pochury, 48. Rabha, 49. Rai 50.Rengma, 51. Sangtam, 52. Sema, 53. Sherpa, 54. Simte,  55. Tamang 56. Tangkhul, 57. Tangsa, 58. Thado, 59. Tibetan, 60. Tripuri, 61. Vaiphei, 62. Wancho, 63. Yimchungre, 64. Zeliang, 65. Zemi, 66. Zou. 

5. SEMITO-HAMITIC

1. Arabic/Arbi
 


We often find that students from rural background face much difficulty in comprehending English. However their reasoning, numerical and logical abilities are as good as or even better than English medium students. Management Courses at the Certificate, Diploma and Degree levels could be introduced in regional languages to tap the unutilized potential of these target groups.

There is great scope for introduction  of   management courses after SSLC, Intermediate, ITI, Polytechnic etc. In fact the progress of  the nation depends to a great extend on the efficiency and effectiveness of these nation builders.

We can think of integrated MBA-cum-Ph.D programs of about 5 years' duration.
for fast-track achievers. Such personnel could be directly absorbed into the Management Institutes from where they graduate in appropriate teaching/research posts.

Other programs for politicians, specially abled children, socially and economically deprived sections etc. can be thought of.  Why not start a Management program for life convicts and other jail inmates? Society will indeed stand to gain from this.

In this connection the initiative taken by Dr. B R Ambedkar Open University for conducting Educational programs for life convicts in Andhra Pradesh is indeed worthy of emulation by one and all. One can but be surprised by the news; "Life convict tops Ambedkar Open university BA exam" ( http://www.newindpress.com/NewsItems.asp?ID=IEU20080330052219&Title=Hyderabad&rLink=0) .

Of course all the above programs will include a happy blend of lectures, group discussions, field work, project, experiential learning activities etc.

In order to develop a "holistic manager" all final semester students have to choose 2 papers from a different elective stream other than his specialization.
 


Dr. T. Thomas
Director
Management Studies
Bellary Engineering College
Bellary-583104
 

Source: E-mail August 11, 2008

           

Articles No. 1-99 / Articles No. 100-199 / Articles No. 200-299 / Articles No. 300-399
Articles No. 400-499 / Articles No. 500-599 / Articles No. 600-699 / Articles No. 700-799
Back to Articles 800 Onward / Faculty Column Main Page